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Hunting Seasons

This is not a legal document. Regulations are subject to revision during the current year. Refer to the Wildlife code. For more information, visit MDC’s website by clicking here.

 Badger
Badgers are heavy-bodied, medium-sized mammals with a broad head, short neck, short legs and a short bushy tail. The ears are low and rounded. The claws, generally gray with a slight yellowish tinge, on the front feet are very long. The brown face is marked with a white stripe, white patches and vertical black bars. Males and females look alike, although males are heavier.
Nov. 15, 2015 – Jan. 31, 2016 Daily limit: Any number

Possession limit: Any number

 Learn More

 

 Bobcat
Bobcats occur statewide but prefer habitat that is thick and brushy. Second-growth timber stands with a lot of underbrush is perfect for bobcats. Food habits of bobcats are much like the canine predators but bobcats rely more heavily on sight for hunting than smell.
Nov. 15, 2015 – Jan. 31, 2016 Daily limit: Any number

Possession limit: Any number

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 Bullfrong & Green Frog
The American bullfrog is Missouri’s largest frog. This common species is easy to hear on warm nights when the males call a deep, sonorous “jug-a-rum, jug-a-rum” that can be heard from half a mile away. The green frog looks similar to a bullfrog but is smaller and has a ridge of skin along the sides of the back that is not found on bullfrogs.
June 30, 2015 – Oct. 31, 2015 Daily limit: 8 (both species combined)

Possession limit: 8

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 Common Snipe
The common snipe is aptly named, because it is common in Missouri’s wetlands and soggy areas. This marsh bird uses its long bill to probe for insects, worms, and larvae that burrow in damp soil. When surprised, snipe take off in a zigzag pattern and call a harsh “scraip, scraip.”
Sept. 1, 2015 – Dec. 19, 2015 Daily limit: 8

Possession limit: 24

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 Coyote
Coyotes are abundant and distributed throughout the state of Missouri. They prefer brushy areas, edges of timbered tracts, and open agricultural country found in the northern Missouri. Coyotes are active both day and night, but activity increases in low light conditions.
May 11, 2015 – March 31, 2016 Daily limit: Any number

Possession limit: Any number

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 Crow
Missouri is home to two species of crow- the fish crow and the American crow. American crows are, by far, the more common of the two and are found statewide, while the fish crow’s range is limited to areas along the Mississippi and Missouri Rivers and a sliver of southwest Missouri.
Nov. 1, 2015 – March 3, 2016 Daily limit: Any number

Possession limit: Any number

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 Deer 
In summer, they are reddish-brown to tan above; the winter the colors are grayish to grayish brown. Fawns are reddish, brown or reddish-yellow spotted with white; they lose their spots and acquire uniform coloration at 3–5 months of age. Antlers normally occur only in males and are formed and shed each year. Antler growth starts in April or May. The white-tailed deer is aptly named because the white undersurface of its flaglike tail is about all that we see in the fleeting glimpse we get as it bounds across an opening in the woods.
 Archery
Sep. 15 2015 – Nov. 13, 2015

Nov. 25 2015 – Jan. 15, 2016

Two deer of either sex,
but only one antlered deer may
be taken before Nov. 14. Hunters may purchase
and fillany number of archery antlerless
deer hunting permits in open counties.
 Firearms – Youth
Oct. 29, 2016 – Oct. 30, 2016

Jan. 2, 2016 – Jan. 3, 2016

Only one deer of either sex may
be taken during the early youth
portion. If you have more than one
permit, you must use them in another
portion. One antlered deer may be taken
during the entire firearms season
(including youth).
 Firearms – November Portion
Nov. 12, 2016 – Nov. 22, 2016 Only one antlered deer may be
taken during the entire firearms season.
The antler point restrictions apply
in some counties. Each county limited the number of
antlerless deer hunting permits you
can fill. See this map.
 Firearms – Antlerless
Dec. 2, 2016 – Dec. 4, 2016 Only antlerless deer may be harvested.
Limits vary on county. See map.
 Firearms – Alternative Methods
Dec. 19, 2015 – Dec. 26, 2015 One antlered deer may be taken during
the entire firearms season (all portions,
including youth). The antler point restrictions
apply in some counties. Each county limits
the number of antlerless deer hunting permits
you can fill. See this map.
 Learn More

 

 Dove
Missouri is home to three species of dove legal to harvest during the dove season. Mourning doves are the most common species found statewide, but hunters may also encounter white-winged doves or Eurasian collared-doves. White-winged doves are common to southwest states and Mexico, and Eurasian collared-doves are increasingly common, especially near urban areas.
Sept. 1, 2015 – Nov. 9, 2015 Daily limit: 15

Possession limit: 45

 Learn More

 

 Ducks & Coots
Canada geese are recognizable by their brownish bodies, black necks and heads, and a distinctive broad white patch that runs beneath their heads from ear to ear. Snow geese have two color forms: white and blue. The “blue goose” was once considered a separate species. Both forms share the distinctive feature of a black “lipstick” streak along the edge of the bill.
 North Zone
Oct. 31, 2015 – Dec. 29, 2015 Ducks:

Daily limit: 6 with species restrictions

Possession limit: 18

Mallards: 4 (no more than 2 females)

Scaup: 3

Wood Ducks: 3

Hooded Mergansers: 2

Pintails: 2

Redheads: 2

Canvasbacks: 2

Black duck: 1

Mottled duck: 1

Coots: 

Daily limit: 15

Possession limit: 45

 Middle Zone
Nov 7, 2015 – Jan. 5, 2016 Ducks:

Daily limit: 6 with species restrictions

Possession limit: 18

Mallards: 4 (no more than 2 females)

Scaup: 3

Wood Ducks: 3

Hooded Mergansers: 2

Pintails: 2

Redheads: 2

Canvasbacks: 2

Black duck: 1

Mottled duck: 1

Coots: 

Daily limit: 15

Possession limit: 45

 South Zone
Nov 26, 2015 – Jan. 24, 2016 Ducks:

Daily limit: 6 with species restrictions

Possession limit: 18

Mallards: 4 (no more than 2 females)

Scaup: 3

Wood Ducks: 3

Hooded Mergansers: 2

Pintails: 2

Redheads: 2

Canvasbacks: 2

Black duck: 1

Mottled duck: 1

Coots: 

Daily limit: 15

Possession limit: 45

 Learn More

 

 Ducks, Coots & Geese – Youth
Youth hunters must be age 15 or younger and accompanied by an adult 18 years old or older who is not allowed to hunt ducks but who can participate in other open seasons.
 North Zone
Oct. 24, 2015 – Oct. 25, 2015 Ducks:

Daily limit: 6 with species restrictions

Possession limit: 18

Mallards: 4 (no more than 2 females)

Scaup: 3

Wood Ducks: 3

Hooded Mergansers: 2

Pintails: 2

Redheads: 2

Canvasbacks: 2

Black duck: 1

Mottled duck: 1

Coots: 

Daily limit: 15, possession limit: 45

Geese: 

Light: daily limit 20, no possession limit

Canada/Brant (combined): daily limit 3, possession limit 9

White-fronted: daily limit 2, possession limit 6

 Middle Zone
Oct. 31, 2015 – Nov. 1, 2015 Ducks:

Daily limit: 6 with species restrictions

Possession limit: 18

Mallards: 4 (no more than 2 females)

Scaup: 3

Wood Ducks: 3

Hooded Mergansers: 2

Pintails: 2

Redheads: 2

Canvasbacks: 2

Black duck: 1

Mottled duck: 1

Coots: 

Daily limit: 15, possession limit: 45

Geese: 

Light: daily limit 20, no possession limit

Canada/Brant (combined): daily limit 3, possession limit 9

White-fronted: daily limit 2, possession limit 6

 South Zone
Nov. 21, 2015 – Nov. 22, 2015 Ducks:

Daily limit: 6 with species restrictions

Possession limit: 18

Mallards: 4 (no more than 2 females)

Scaup: 3

Wood Ducks: 3

Hooded Mergansers: 2

Pintails: 2

Redheads: 2

Canvasbacks: 2

Black duck: 1

Mottled duck: 1

Coots: 

Daily limit: 15, possession limit: 45

Geese: 

Light: daily limit 20, no possession limit

Canada/Brant (combined): daily limit 3, possession limit 9

White-fronted: daily limit 2, possession limit 6

 Learn More

 

 Fox (Red or Gray)
Doglike in appearance with an elongated, pointed muzzle, large pointed ears that are usually held erect and forward, moderately long legs, and a long, heavily furred, bushy tail that is circular in cross section. The fur is long, thick and soft. The pupil of the eye is vertically elliptical. Upperparts are reddish yellow, becoming slightly darker on the back. Gray foxes resemble red foxes in general build but are distinguished by their grayish coloration, slightly smaller size, black-tipped tail that is triangular (not circular) in cross section, coarser body fur and dark brown (not tawny) iris of the eye.
Nov. 15, 2015 – Jan. 31, 2016 Daily limit: Any number

Possession limit: Any number

 Learn More

 

 Geese
Canada geese are recognizable by their brownish bodies, black necks and heads, and a distinctive broad white patch that runs beneath their heads from ear to ear. Snow geese have two color forms: white and blue. The “blue goose” was once considered a separate species. Both forms share the distinctive feature of a black “lipstick” streak along the edge of the bill.
 Light Geese
Oct. 31, 2015 – Jan. 31, 2016 Daily limit: 20

Possession limit: None

 Greater White-fronted Geese
Nov. 7, 2015 – Jan. 31, 2016 Daily limit: 2

Possession limit: 6

 Brant Geese
Oct. 3, 2015 – Oct. 11, 2015

Nov. 26, 2015 – Jan. 31, 2016

Daily limit: 3

Possession limit: 9

Daily limit & possession limits
are brant & Canada combined.

 Canada Geese
Oct. 3, 2015 – Oct. 11, 2015

Nov. 26, 2015 – Jan. 31, 2016

Daily limit: 3

Possession limit: 9

Daily limit & possession limits
are brant & Canada combined.

 Light Goose Conservation Order
Feb. 1, 2016 – April 30, 2016 Daily limit: none

Possession limit: none

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 Groundhog
This common Missouri rodent has short, powerful legs and a medium-long, bushy, and somewhat flattened tail. The long, coarse fur of the back is a grizzled grayish brown with a yellowish or reddish cast. Woodchucks weigh least in spring when they are just out of hibernation and most in fall prior to hibernation.
May. 11, 2015 – Dec. 15, 2015 Daily limit: Any number

Possession limit: Any number

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 Opossum
Opossums are medium-sized mammals with long, rather coarse, grayish-white (sometimes darker) fur; a sharp, slender muzzle with a pink nose; prominent, thin, naked ears; a white or yellowish-white head; short legs; and a long, grasping tail covered with scales and scant hairs. Males and females look alike, although mature females possess a fur-lined belly pouch for carrying young, and adult males in particular often have damaged ears and tail tips due to freezing.
Nov. 15, 2015 – Jan. 31, 2016 Daily limit: Any number

Possession limit: Any number

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 Pheasant
Ring-necked pheasants were introduced to the United States from China in the 1880s and have become one of the nation’s most popular game birds. Unlike most species not native to an area, pheasants have few negative impacts on native wildlife. Rather than displacing native species, pheasants have been able to thrive in agricultural areas where some native species, such as prairie chickens, have not.
Nov. 1, 2015 – Jan. 15, 2016 Daily limit: 2

Possession limit: 4

 Youth
Oct. 24, 2015 – Oct. 25, 2015 Daily limit: 2

Possession limit: 4

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 Quail
Known simply as “quail” or “bobwhite,” the northern bobwhite can be found in every county in Missouri. Bobwhites are so named for the male’s cheery call issued from fenceposts or other elevated perches in late spring and through summer.
Nov. 1, 2015 – Jan. 15, 2016 Daily limit: 8

Possession limit: 16

 Youth
Oct. 24, 2015 – Oct. 25, 2015 Daily limit: 8

Possession limit: 16

 Learn More

 

 Rabbit
Of the two rabbit species that may be hunted in Missouri, the eastern cottontail is the most common. Cottontails are well distributed throughout Missouri, and they provide fun, challenging hunting opportunities to novice and experienced hunters alike. Swamp rabbits are a little larger than cottontails with shorter, rounder ears, and the tops of the hind feet are reddish-brown.
Oct. 1, 2015 – Feb. 15, 2016 Daily limit: 6, only 2 may be swamp

Possession limit: 12, only 4 may be swamp

 Learn More

 

 Raccoon
Raccoons are a medium-sized mammal with a noticeable black mask over the eyes and a ringed tail. Males and females look alike, although males are heavier. Raccoons can weigh between 6 and 25 pounds. They prefer timbered habitat near water. They are also common sights in urban and suburban areas. They make dens in hollow trees, caves, rocky crevices, and abandoned woodchuck burrows, among other places.
Nov. 15, 2015 – Jan. 31, 2016 Daily limit: Any number

Possession limit: Any number

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 Sora & Virginia Rails
Virginia and sora rails are the only two species that may be harvested, and sora is the most abundant of these.Rails are predominantly marsh birds and can be seen and heard on many wetland conservation areas lurking in thick vegetation. Rails are omnivores and eat a wide variety of plants, insects, snails, and crayfish with their long bill made for probing in moist soils.
Sept. 1, 2015 – Nov. 9, 2015 Daily limit: 25

Possession limit: 75

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 Striped Skunk
A cat-sized mammal with a prominent long-haired tail. The fur is black, usually with a white stripe running down the head and dividing to become two stripes on each side of the body. Often smelled before they are seen, skunks produce an obnoxious scent upon provocation.
Nov. 15, 2015 – Jan. 31, 2016 Daily limit: Any number

Possession limit: Any number

 Learn More

 

 Squirrel
In Missouri, hunters may pursue two species of tree squirrels — fox squirrels, often called “red squirrels,” and eastern gray squirrels. Fox squirrels are the larger of the two species. They tend to be found near the edges of timber stands, in isolated woodlots and open woods without much understory, along timbered ridges and uplands, and even in hedgerows. Grays are more likely to occur in extensive tracts of forest and bottomlands, but it’s not unusual to find both species using the same area.
May 23, 2015 – Feb. 15, 2016 Daily limit: 10

Possession limit: 20

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 Teal
Blue-winged teal are second only to mallards as the most numerous duck in North America. Blue-winged teal are among the earliest ducks to migrate south during fall and the latest to head north during spring. Teal stay in Missouri a relatively short time, so the best hunting usually occurs when cold fronts bring winds favorable for migration.
Sep. 12, 2015 – Sep. 27, 2015 Daily bag limit: 6

Possession limit: 18

Limits are a combined total of all teal species.

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 Turkey
Adult males are very large and dark with a bare, red and blue head, with red wattles on the throat and neck. They have long legs. The feathers are bronzy and iridescent. Males, and some females, have a tuft of hairlike feathers (a “beard”) in the middle of the breast. Females are smaller and less iridescent. Turkeys are most famous for their gobbling calls, but they make many other vocalizations as well.
 Archery
Sep. 15, 2015 – Nov. 11, 2016

Nov. 25, 2015 – Jan. 15, 2016

Two turkeys of either sex,
both may be taken on the same day
 Fall Firearms
Oct. 1, 2016 – Oct. 31, 2016 Two male turkeys or turkeys with visible beard
may be taken both on the same day.
 Spring
April 18, 2016 – May 8, 2016 Two male turkeys or turkeys with visible beard
may be taken with the following restrictions:

  • You may take only one turkey during the first week
  • If you do not take one during the first week, then you may
    take two turkeys during the second and third week.
  • You may not take two turkeys on the same day.
 Youth – Spring
April 9, 2016 – April 10, 2016 One male turkey or turkey with visible beard.
Youths who take a turkey during the youth season
may not harvest a second bird until April 27.
 Learn More

 

 Woodcock
A migratory species, American woodcock visit Missouri in the fall and spring on their way to and from their wintering grounds in the southeastern states. The woodcock is unique among Missouri’s game birds in that it is classified as a shorebird, but spends nearly all of its life in upland forests, forest edges, old fields and meadows.
Oct. 15, 2015 – Nov. 28, 2015 Daily limit: 3

Possession limit: 9

 Learn More
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